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SLEEPY HOLLOW BOOK

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"The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is a gothic story by American author Washington Irving, . Irving wrote The Sketch Book during a tour of Europe, and parts of the tale may also be traced to European origins. Headless horsemen were staples of . The Legend of Sleepy Hollow book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Headless horsemen were staples of Northern European. Books shelved as sleepy-hollow: Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution by Keith R.A. DeCandido, The Hollow by Jessica Verday, The Secret Journal of Ic.


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ppti.info: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (): Washington Irving: Books. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, short story by Washington Irving, first published in The Sketch Book in – The protagonist of. Everyone knows the story of Sleepy Hollow but how many know that its author inspiration from real-life events that took place in and around.

It might be worth a quick read for these reasons--it was for me--however, beyond that, the story didn't really do all that much for me. Sep 25, Mackey rated it really liked it Shelves: Here in Indiana US there is a town called Irvington that has absolutely no historic connection to Washington Irving at all but never-the-less each year produces a marvelous and quite large Halloween festival in his honor. It lasts a week and centers around the characters from The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.

I decided it was time re-read the story to catch up on all things forgotten. It's a simple tale really. A schoolmaster, Ichabod Crane, is trying to woo a young woman from town and it angers th Here in Indiana US there is a town called Irvington that has absolutely no historic connection to Washington Irving at all but never-the-less each year produces a marvelous and quite large Halloween festival in his honor.

A schoolmaster, Ichabod Crane, is trying to woo a young woman from town and it angers the town bully. This leads to the "frightening" scene of the headless horseman and Crane's demise. Although it's a very short read, one that is perfect for Halloween, it is a beautiful example of Irving's writing ability. As a reporter for many years, he writes about the town and people in such great detail that you will remember them long after you've put down the book, perhaps even years later.

If you've never read the story then now is a great time. If you have read it, I encourage you to read it once more. You will be amazed at what you've forgotten. View all 22 comments. Oct 25, Apatt rated it it was ok Shelves: For most classics that I read it is easy to discern how they have stood the test of time and attain their classic status. However, a few titles, like Moby-Dick; or, The Whale and Three Men in a Boat hold little or no appeal to me at all, and why would anybody want to read them is beyond me.

The prose style is indeed a pleasure to read. No tale was too gross or monstrous for his capacious swallow. The original Crane as featured in this story is very much an anti-hero, he is not brave, decent, honest or even good looking.

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Both the Tim Burton movie and the new Sleepy Hollow TV series have taken the image of the Horseman from this story and upgraded him into a much more frightening and supernatural antagonist. As a general rule, movie and TV adaptations are always inferior to the literary source material. So I suppose I do have something to be grateful to Washington Irving for after all. Not my pick for a Halloween read. Oct 21, Phrynne rated it really liked it.

Thanks Stephanie - your review led me to read this and I am so glad I did: I suppose it is because I had my education in England that this book was not part of my school reading nor had I come across it since.

So it was a first time read for me and it was delightful! I always love stories written in this kind of old fashioned and extremely literate prose.

The descriptions are just superb, especially the one of Ichabod Crane. At the end of that the reader knows exactly what he looked like to the Thanks Stephanie - your review led me to read this and I am so glad I did: At the end of that the reader knows exactly what he looked like to the point of being able to draw his picture!

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Compared to the literature available today I would not describe this book as horror. Just a little bit spooky maybe. But very well written and extremely entertaining.

View all 3 comments. Well, hello there, Mr. Ichabod Crane! I cannot believe I waited so long before meeting you. I really don't see the horror part in this classic. I found myself smiling throughout the entire story. And it was all Irving's fault. He's just so funny and charming.

There was no dialogue at all. I became aware of that at some point and wandered how come I still enjoyed it.

The ending fit the character perfectly. I would have not wanted it any other way. I loved the narration of this story. Tom Mison the actor from the Sleepy Hollow television show narrates this book and I could seriously listen to his voice all day long. Unfortunately, I didn't liked the actual story as much as I thought I would.

I really wish the story was a bit darker and less descriptive. I would give the narration 5 stars and the story 3 stars so I'm going with 4 stars overall. I grabbed this audiobook for free from audible a while ago and it appears that it is no longer f I loved the narration of this story. I grabbed this audiobook for free from audible a while ago and it appears that it is no longer free. I thought it was an enjoyable way to spend an hour or so.

I first encountered this story when I was a child. It was a classic animated film. Do children watch this movie anymore? Anyways, this young school teacher tries to impress a young woman, so he can have the luxuries of life. Oddly, I felt like this man was my kindred spirit. He seemed more impressed with the food than the mistress he was trying to pursue. It was an Alex moment, and I was starving by the e 3. It was an Alex moment, and I was starving by the end of my car ride.

I don't know if any of you guys have the same problem, but I tend to get real imaginative at night. This is why I refrain from watching scary movies. I tried to watch American Horror Story the other night, and stopped myself.

I said I would watch it in the day time, since I wouldn't freak myself out. I am a weeny, I know! Same with this fine, hungry gentleman when walking home at night. I could relate. The writing was picturesque. Like I stated before I was hungry, and I could imagine the heart wrenching critical scenes.

I wish there was more, but at the same time I think if the author lengthen his story it would become boring. I am up in the air at the length. It was fun, not really spooky. Could the legend be true, or a prank, or the figment of our imagination.

Enjoy this short, classic story. I am ready to read more scary classics! Siempre quise leer esta corta historia de Washington Irving , uno de los precursores de la literatura norteamericana y considerado como el primer escritor de best-sellers americano.

Mar 11, Melissa Jeanette rated it really liked it Shelves: I really enjoyed this book. After having just watched the Johny Depp movie version, I was surprised to find the book had almost nothing in common. I read it mostly at night and I enjoyed the spooky moments though I admit my idea of spooky is pretty low on the scale for some. Ichabod is mildly detestable as a character; he seems like he has all the foundational qualities to make a wonderful villain, were this another story.

I laughed at his envisioning the Van Tassel's animals as sumptuously co I really enjoyed this book. I laughed at his envisioning the Van Tassel's animals as sumptuously cooked dishes which he hoped to enjoy throughout the winter.

This is a tale clearly written for the sensibilities of another time, and as such, I enjoyed the historical value. As other reviewers have noted, his descriptions of the people and the period were marvelous. I loved the descriptions of the countryside, which is unusual for me.

Since it was such a short read, I didn't mind slowing down to imagine the scenery. This is one of my favorite bits: View all 6 comments. Aug 28, Eryn rated it liked it Shelves: Great writing but mediocre Gothic story. Oct 02, Jess Primrose rated it really liked it. The entire time I read this though, I kept seeing the Disney version in my head and marveling at how well they captured the caricature of the schoolmaster that Irving seemed to be portraying and I had no idea as a child.

Irving who I'm now extremely interesting in researching more on his life a Disclaimer: He aims to the wealth of the comfortable farmer Van Tassel through his delightful, peach of a daughter, a coquette called Katrina.

The protagonist, Ichabod, boorishly assumes his passable talent at psalm singing and higher refinement than the bumpkin group of boys, coined the Sleepy Hollow Boys will endear him to Katrina and the largesse of her father's farm. He doesn't quite understand the determination of Brom Bones nor the aims of the Headless Horseman..

A really fun way to launch October reading. Though no where near as chilling or macabre as modern writing can be, it was a delightful satire into the world of New England after the Revolutionary War. I can't wait to read more into what Irving may have meant in this charming short story. I hope to update the review accordingly.

Sep 28, Mario rated it it was ok Shelves: I really wanted to like this story but it definitely wasn't my cup of tea. Honestly, I found the story boring. The author spent too much time on description, so the story was quite slow and it dragged. I was also really disappointed with the end. I expected that the ending will scare me at least a little but, but it didn't.

The story ended pretty abruptly, and now that I've finished it, I'm glad it did. Even though this was a pretty short story, it sure felt like a long one.

Now I'm off to see t I really wanted to like this story but it definitely wasn't my cup of tea. Now I'm off to see the movie.

Hopefully I'll enjoyed it more than I enjoyed this short story. I also found the story really loaded down with long, unnecessary descriptions and really slow to start. View 2 comments. Read for my Anglo-American literatures course. I also re-watched the Disney short film, of course. View 1 comment. Me ha parecido aburrido, y se me ha hecho cuesta arriba terminarlo, a pesar de ser tan corto. No lo recomiendo. Aug 02, Anne rated it liked it Shelves: To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him one might have mistaken him for the genius of a famine descending upon the earth or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield" That's just wrong.

Where's the love? This story wasn't as scary and dark or spectacular as I imagined it would be. I don't know what they're doing with the Sleepy hollow Tv show. But they should keep doing. The Ichabod Crane in here isn't as valiant or heroic or even remotely interesting as I made myself believe; as they made me believe. Ichabod in media content is not the Ichabod in the book. That's probably a good thing because they wouldn't pay me enough to watch a dry-ass, petty and mediocre Ichabod on screen.

I liked the idea of a town like Sleepy hollow. One buried in superstitions, ghosts and phantom stories. One as bewitching as it. Crane's a gold-digger. But a whole paragraph on food listing and not in a mouthwatering way? What really had me piqued and appeased was the suspended state of the ending. The mystery that surrounds the ending: We even owe our holiday celebrations to Irving, since it was he, along with Charles Dickens, who helped to make Christmas into the secular holiday of gift-giving and merry-making that it is today.

Irving played a hand in the creation of Santa Claus, too, with a story about St. Nicholas in his first book. With his love of ghost stories, Irving is also one of the architects of Halloween—and thousands still make the pilgrimage to visit his tombstone in that ghoulish time of the year.

I cannot even escape his influence in Spain, since it was Irving who helped to spread the exotic, enchanted image of Andalusia, and who thus helped make Spain a tourist destination; and it was partly thanks to his book of stories about the Alhambra that people began taking an interest in restoring that old ruin.

Washington Irving was named after George Washington, and was born just a few weeks before the Revolutionary War was officially concluded. He was a new man for a new land. Whether it happened or not, the story seems symbolic of the role that Irving would play in American literature—exactly analogous to George Washington in politics—as a pioneering leader. For it was Washington Irving who was the first American writer to be respected by his English peers. He showed that these unruly savages overseas could aspire to eloquence too.

The book, often merely called The Sketchbook, is a sort of parody of the sketchbooks that other wealthy American travelers made on their visits to Europe. It is framed as a travel book, and contains many vignettes about places Irving visited. But Irving does not stick to this theme very diligently.

The book also contains some short pieces about Native Americans; and the two most famous stories, "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle," are both set in New York, and purport to be found among the old papers of Diedrich Knickerbocker.

Ichabod is greatly disturbed and tries to shake off his pursuer, but he fails. Finally, he notices that the rider has no head on his shoulders; the head seems to be sitting on the saddle in front of the man. Ichabod tries to get his decrepit horse to run home as fast as it can, but he is not a skilled rider and the horse resists.

They end up by the church, the scene of most of the stories of the Headless Horseman, and Ichabod races to the bridge where the ghost is said to disappear and not follow.

Ichabod crosses the bridge and looks back, but he sees the Horseman, instead of disappearing, hurl his detached head at him. It knocks Ichabod off of his horse. Ichabod is never heard from again in Sleepy Hollow, although later on it seems that he is alive elsewhere and has told his story. Some of the townspeople believe that Brom Bones pulled off a great prank—which put Brom in the final position to marry Katrina—but the old women and local folklore maintain that he was taken by the Headless Horseman.

What does the author's choice to tell the story through the voice of such a familiar and chatty narrator contribute to the overall meaning of the text? I suppose it creates a connection with the reader. The story has the mood and tone of a ghost story or local mythology. The narrator fills that familiar perspective for the reader. They have been brought up on stories of superstition and local mythology.

Stories were passed down from generations. What passed at this interview I will not pretend to say, for in fact I do not know. Something, however, I fear me, must have gone wrong, for he certainly sallied forth, after no very greatAs he jogged slowly on his way, his eye ranged with delight over the treasures of jolly autumn.

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

In two sketches, he experiments with tales transplanted from Europe, thereby creating the first classic American short stories, Rip Van Winkle, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.

It was an Alex moment, and I was starving by the e 3. Not these of the bevy of lasses…but the ample charms of a genuine Dutch country tea-table, in the sumptuous time of autumn.

If you were to get all your political information from watching the ads sandwiching the evening newscast, you would come to a shocking revelation. This is one of my favorite bits: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow literature essays are academic essays for citation. The entire time I read this though, I kept seeing the Disney version in my head and marveling at how well they captured the caricature of the schoolmaster that Irving seemed to be portraying and I had no idea as a child.

Was Katrina's encouragement of the poor pedagogue all a mere trick to secure her conquest of his rival!

ROBBIE from Hawaii
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