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CONFESSIONS OF AN ENGLISH OPIUM EATER PDF

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Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. A penitential loneliness. *PDF created by ppti.info 1 . the Opium Confessions–”How came any reasonable being to subject himself to such a yoke of which afterwards peopled the dreams of the Opium-eater. 3. As creating some. Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and Other It is so long since I first took opium that if it had been a trifling incident in my life I might.


Confessions Of An English Opium Eater Pdf

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Confessions of an English Opium-Eater - PDF Preview recounts his life as a student, his experiences among London's outcasts, and his addiction to opium. Confessions of an English Opium-Eater. Being an extract from https://ebooks. ppti.info Last updated Sunday. Confessions of an English Opium-Eater () is an autobiographical account written by . Print/export. Create a book · Download as PDF · Printable version.

In his Suspiria de Profundis De Quincey famously compared the human brain to a palimpsest, and his own writings, richly layered with recurrent motifs and tropes, have been similarly constructed in the critical tradition as being inherently and profoundly unified.

Rzepka follows this familiar route of reading De Quincey's oeuvre as interlinked and largely coherent, positing the Confessions of an English Opium-Eater as the textual nexus for the opium-eater's lifelong cogitation on "the connections between literary power and the Sublime, between the Sublime and sublimation, between sublimation and gift-giving, between gift-giving and sacrament, between sacrament and sacrifice" x. This list of topics and associations provides some indication of the sweeping scope of Rzepka's book, ranging through De Quincey's multi-layered texts in the pursuit of his argument.

At the heart of Rzepka's argument is his working out of the relationship between De Quincey's theoretical notion of literary "power" and his desire to achieve freedom from material dependency.

In order to find the whole reviews you will have to search in "Romanticism on the Net" for "De Quincey"]. Julian North, De Quincey Reviewed: Thomas De Quincey's Critical Reception, by Albert Morrison Excerpt: "De Quincey Reviewed is divided into twelve chapters, eleven of which necessarily concern his autobiographical writings, which have always been the centre of critical interest; a final chapter concerns De Quincey himself as critic and scholar.

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The discussion proceeds chronologically, and surveys nineteenth-century constructions of 'De Quincey as Ruined Genius' and Romantic autobiographer, before considering the reaction to his work by 'Aesthetes and Moralists' in the s and 70s, and the dominant interest in him as 'Prose Stylist' in the s and 90s.

North then moves from early twentieth-century representations of De Quincey as 'Degenerate', 'Musician' , and 'Modernist', through the landmark essays of J.

Hillis Miller and Robert Maniquis , and to the deconstructionism of the late s and 80s. The book concludes with the new historicism of the early s, seen most flamboyantly in the 'unashamed sensationalism' of John Barrell's The Infection of Thomas De Quincey. De Quincey's early acquaintance with the Lyrical Ballads was made through the Evangelical circles of his mother, who was a follower of Hannah More and a member of the Clapham sect.

In later years, however, De Quincey repudiated his early Evangelical upbringing and wrote quite scathingly of the literary pretensions of Hannah More.

This paper attempts to uncover the revisionary nature of De Quincey's later reminiscences of More and to indicate thereby the covert influence of Evangelical thinking on his literary theorizing.

Far from absolving literature of politics, however, colonialist and nationalist imperatives typical of Evangelical thinking may be seen to operate within the spiritualized and aesthetic sphere to which literary power is arrogated by De Quincey. Cambridge Excerpt: "In a vicious article on 'The Humbugs of the Age', William Maginn pilloried Thomas De Quincey as, among other things, 'a sort of hanger-on' with 'the lake school', and the notion of De Quincey as the disciple or imitator of Wordsworth and Coleridge has often attracted critical attention.

In her new book, Margaret Russett extends and theorizes the notion of De Quincey's 'minority', and his various textual and psychological debts to the two older poets.

As she notes, 'De Quincey's imbrication in the cult of self-sustaining poetic genius, on one hand, and the context of periodical writing and proto-professional criticism, on the other, situates him at a historical crux whose symptom, minority, is inextricable from our received narratives of greatness' p.

In support of this argument, Russett explores a wide range of contemporary concerns, from the anonymous authorship of the Waverley novels to the Copyright Act of , and she relies extensively on the theories of poststructuralism, or what she calls 'involuted analysis' p. De Quincey was well-read in the English literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and assimilated influences and models from Sir Thomas Browne and other writers.

Arguably the most famous and often-quoted passage in the Confessions is the apostrophe to opium in the final paragraph of The Pleasures: "Oh!

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And sometimes in my attempts to steer homewards, upon nautical principles, by fixing my eye on the pole-star, and seeking ambitiously for a north-west passage, instead of circumnavigating all the capes and headlands I had doubled in my outward voyage, I came suddenly upon such knotty problems of alleys, such enigmatical entries, and such sphinx's riddles of streets without thoroughfares, as must, I conceive, baffle the audacity of porters, and confound the intellects of hackney-coachmen.

The revision[ edit ] In the early s, De Quincey prepared the first collected edition of his works for publisher James Hogg.

For that edition, he undertook a large-scale revision of the Confessions, more than doubling the work's length. Most notably, he expanded the opening section on his personal background, until it consumed more than two-thirds of the whole.

Yet he gave the book "a much weaker beginning" and detracted from the impact of the original with digressions and inconsistencies; "the verdict of most critics is that the earlier version is artistically superior". Since there was little systematic study of narcotics until long after his death, De Quincey's account assumed an authoritative status and actually dominated the scientific and public views of the effects of opium for several generations.

As early as , an anonymous response, Advice to Opium Eaters, was published "to warn others from copying De Quincey.

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One of the characters of the Sherlock Holmes story, The Man with the Twisted Lip , is an opium addict who began experimenting with the drug as a student after reading the Confessions. De Quincey attempted to address this type of criticism. When the original was printed in book form the following year, he added an Appendix on the withdrawal process; and he inserted significant material on the medical aspects of opium into his revision.

IV, No.The discussion proceeds chronologically, and surveys nineteenth-century constructions of 'De Quincey as Ruined Genius' and Romantic autobiographer, before considering the reaction to his work by 'Aesthetes and Moralists' in the s and 70s, and the dominant interest in him as 'Prose Stylist' in the s and 90s.

Doollee The Playwrights Database. More generally, De Quincey's Confessions influenced psychology and abnormal psychology , and attitudes towards dreams and imaginative literature.

Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

Authority control BNF: Abstract Confessions of an English Opium eater by Thomas de Quincey is one of the first important testimonies about the experience of drug use.

Hidden categories: As a whole, it may perhaps most usefully be seen as a counter to Margaret Russett's recent claims regarding De Quincey's 'minority', [6] for North demonstrates that De Quincey, in his own right, has long attracted considerable critical notice as madman, rhetorician, degenerate, and visionary.

De Quincey was well-read in the English literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and assimilated influences and models from Sir Thomas Browne and other writers. Confessions of an English Opium-Eater also served as inspiration to one of Hector Berlioz 's most famous pieces, Symphonie fantastique.

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