ppti.info Personal Growth Angel Pavement Book

ANGEL PAVEMENT BOOK

Sunday, June 2, 2019


Angel Pavement book. Read 23 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. What do they call this street? Angel Pavement, isn't it? That's a d. Angel Pavement is a novel by J. B. Priestley, published in after the enormous success of Mr Golspie arrives with a dispatch case containing a sample book of veneers and inlays, and asks to see Mr Dersingham. After a short delay, he is. ppti.info: Angel Pavement (): J. B. Priestley: Books.


Author:BEULAH REHMEIER
Language:English, Spanish, Japanese
Country:Cameroon
Genre:Science & Research
Pages:790
Published (Last):12.09.2015
ISBN:633-9-59070-555-7
ePub File Size:20.55 MB
PDF File Size:9.11 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads:48968
Uploaded by: ISAIAH

Angel Pavement by J. B. Priestley, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Results 1 - 30 of Angel Pavement by Priestley, J B and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at ppti.info Complete summary of J. B. Priestley's Angel Pavement. eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of Angel Pavement.

View all 6 comments. Aug 09, Auriel Roe rated it really liked it. Ponderous descriptions but I loved the detail, many wouldn't, unused to the absurd. Good story, a con man totally messes up an odd little veneer business staffed by hopeless subordinates. Feb 05, Evi Routoula rated it it was amazing. Apr 17, J. This has no real tricks up its sleeve, but draws the reader nonetheless. We have what amounts to a large-cast Dickens or Trollope outing, complete with competing narrative threads and class discordance.

This begins much as all London novels do-- in the swirl of life being lived, the just-manageable chaos driven by commerce and urbanism unbound-- and somehow manages to narrow down to separate characters by the early chapters. And great characters, in large part because of their un-remarkableness.

He looked what he ought to have been, in the opinion of a few thousand hasty and foolish observers of this life, and what he was not--a grey drudge.

Angel Pavement and its kind, too hot and airless in summer, too raw in winter, too wet in spring, and too smoky and foggy in autumn, assisted by long hours of artificial light, by hasty breakfasts and illusory lunches, by walks in boots made of sodden cardboard and rides in germ-haunted buses, by fuss all day and worry at night, had blanched the whole man, had thinned his hair and turned it grey, wrinkled his forehead and the space at each side of his short grey moustache, put eyeglasses at one end of his nose and slightly sharpened and reddened the other end At the opening of Angel Pavement we've left the Great War behind, but the marks remain, a great shadow has passed over civilization.

Like a lot of between-the-wars novels, there is the sense of trying a little over-hard at inducing amnesia, getting the old peacetime gears and levers to work again, with a hopeful but semi-blindered populace. The story takes us from Englishman's-home-is-his-castle pomp to the familiar threadbare boarding house existence, a matter of streets or tube stops away.

Find a copy in the library

The milieu will be familiar to readers of Norman Collins or Patrick Hamilton. Priestley's basic premise is picaresque, giving the reader a few pointed glimpses at the follies and foibles of the faces on the street, via the particular faces he's chosen. In order that she might not be overlooked in company and also to protect herself, she had developed and brought very near to perfection a curiously disturbing manner, which conveyed a boundless suggestion of the malicious, the mocking, the sarcastic, the sardonic, the ironical.

What she actually said was harmless enough but her tone of voice, her expression, her smile, her glance, all these suggested that her words had some devilish inner meaning Not long after the structure is laid out, as the characters become more familiar, we're treated to comedic turns in the story, where perhaps the reader is led to know more about what will happen than the people involved.

In fact, at points the Dickens set pieces and face-offs begin more and more to resemble the more latter-day style of absurdity meeting staunch postwar reserve. Not altogether distant from the Ealing Studio films of the later decades-- but all is not well.

We begin by midbook to get the feeling that things may not work out for the best, as they do in the movies. No need here to summarize the proceedings; best to say that things will not go according to plan, nor will there be bluebirds over the white cliffs of Dover by the end. Priestley is taking stock, somewhere before mid-century, and finding things are amiss in his remarkable world.

He's worried. There will be no eureka moment, or neat conclusion, but safe to say he's on to something with that.

Oct 18, Natsnock rated it really liked it. The whole time I was reading the book, I was thinking how suitable it is for mini series. As it turns out, there are 2 of them - one from the 50s and one from the 60s unfortunately nowhere to be found for downloading.

So, if you're hooked on British period dramas, looking not so much for good dramatic plot, but for a fine depiction of everyday life and the subtle irony of presenting the characters the British are so good at, this one might be for you - London in the 30s, but in the form of a b The whole time I was reading the book, I was thinking how suitable it is for mini series.

So, if you're hooked on British period dramas, looking not so much for good dramatic plot, but for a fine depiction of everyday life and the subtle irony of presenting the characters the British are so good at, this one might be for you - London in the 30s, but in the form of a book.

Aug 02, Kerri Thomas rated it really liked it. A tale of common life experience, of fantasies and fears coming true. I appreciated this book far more the second time I read it because I saw more in it.

JB Priestley - Angel Pavement

At first, I felt that Priestley was giving way too much information about his characters, but by the end of the book it had dawned on me that he was writing about fundamental lessons in life that we can all relate to and, in order to do that, he needed to give the reader a thorough look into the hearts and minds of his characters. The focus of A tale of common life experience, of fantasies and fears coming true. It's address is a street called Angel Pavement, hence the name of the book. The catalyst of the tale is the arrival at the firm of a man of no scruples, Mr Golspie, who intends to use the firm to make a lot of money very quickly and then get out.

Both he and his beautiful daughter are incarnations of the fantasies that two staff members, Turgis and Miss Matfield, have on a daily basis.

Turgis hungers for love and sex; Miss Matfield longs for adventure and excitement. Well, both get their fantasies made real through the Golspies, but with devastating consequences. Smeeth, the office manager, yearns for safety and security but has always feared that he will not have it. Again, through the actions of Golspie, his fears come true. Then there's the principal of the firm, Mr Dersingham, who is going through the motions of being a businessman; his heart is not in it and he just muddles through his life.

When Golspie departs, he has turned Mr Dersingham's world upside down but we are left with the idea that he will actually begin to live the life he has always wanted to. Priestley is saying through the lives of his characters 'be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it', but he is also saying that out of great pain and upheaval, life can improve because we become wiser and more mature.

This is a timeless story of human experience, and Priestley does a masterful job of describing the scenes in which it is set, London in the grip of a bleak, depressing winter. He also captures perfectly the mangled English of the working class British.

This is indeed a book about life that we can all relate to. View 2 comments. Sep 16, Estott rated it really liked it. A good book, rather sad overall. A study of the employees in a small London office, all leading lives of "quiet desperation". In comes a rather charismatic and piratical figure, and his daughter and everyone's life is affected. It's pretty obvious from the beginning that things will not end well, but the characters are all well drawn. Jul 04, Alan Mackay rated it really liked it.

Both could be described as soap operas but none the worse for that. A must read for anyone interested in London and London working life that has mostly disappeared for ever.

Aug 16, Malcolm Noble rated it it was amazing. Truly one of the great "London" books of 20th Century. Not very cheerful, I'm afraid, but well written. Take your time with this one. Jul 16, Rachel Stevenson rated it liked it. Dickensian in scope, Hardy-esque in plot. Mar 16, Colm Mccrory rated it really liked it. Jan 14, Jenn rated it it was amazing Shelves: Pity the generation that lived through the great depression. I thought this was one of the most moving books I have read for a long time.

It is not dramatic, the action such as it is is very low key, the characters are mundane and the subject it deals with office work is hardly going to be thrilling, but Priestley had a knack of really getting under the skin of his characters so you cared about the outcome.

I ended up wondering what happened to Turgis, Mr Smeeth, Miss Matfield et all after the Pity the generation that lived through the great depression.

Angel Pavement

I ended up wondering what happened to Turgis, Mr Smeeth, Miss Matfield et all after the book finished. Basically the plot centres round the small firm of Twigg and Dursingham located in a London backstreet. The firm is struggling: He employs Mr Smeeth, a cautious accounts manager, perpetually worrying about the future; Turgis the lonely teenage clerk, living in lodgings and dreaming of romance and Miss Matfield the frustrated, intelligent secretary, who lives in a women's shared residential house.

Into their lives strides the larger than life Mr Golspie, with promises of cheap imports from abroad and easy profits to be made and his glamorous daughter. It's a close observation of life in London in Apparently very popular in its time, but Priestley has gone out of fashion as the years have gone by unfairly I think.

If you are interested in social history this is a fantastic book, I loved the detail, for instance the tobacconists shop round the corner from the office, Turgis setting out for the bright lights of London's West End on a Saturday night or the dreadful dinner party with the couple recently back from Singapore.

Some of it I remembered as dim reflections from my Grandparents, such as the Front Room which was kept respectable and never used except for high days and holidays.

I remember seven of us squeezed into a back room just so it could be left empty. And the cramped sitting room of the Smeeths, full of cheap ornaments proudly displayed, also just like my Gran. Having a teenage son myself who is surly and spotty and girl mad I felt particularly for the lonely Turgis.

I was nearly in tears when he tried to gas himself and realised he didn't have the money to pay for it, and when he finally hooks up with Poppy and realises the girl of his dreams was under his nose all along, so touching Saturday night: Forget Dickens. Interestingly Priestley doesn't indulge in back stories. The story is firmly focused on the present only.

Angel Pavement,

A modern writer would flash back to Dursingham's and Smeeth's war experiences, or Turgis's difficult upbringing, but there is none of this. Presumably not fashionable in his own time, they were probably keen to forget the War had ever been. My copy was so battered and yellowed it was probably bought not long after it was printed! I didn't like taking it places for I was worried it would fall apart.

I don't normally keep books after reading but I'll keep this one. Dec 04, Ginni rated it really liked it. My first J.

Priestley, an author I've been meaning to try for years; this reading was partly inspired by going to see a production of 'When we are married' at the West Yorkshire Playhouse a month or so past.

I really felt that as an honorary Yorkshire woman, now living close to Bradford, I must read Priestley.

I suppose Priestley has gone out of fashion; this ne My first J. I suppose Priestley has gone out of fashion; this new edition seems timely, then. I thoroughly enjoyed this, very much a book of its time in many ways, and with some phrases and attitudes that may jar with modern readers. All reviewers agree that the portrait of London is tremendous; albeit a London of the s with no tower blocks and less sophistication, it is recognisably the City and the Docks, the bustle, crowds, dirt and noise, the lights and the traffic, many people yet much loneliness and disillusion.

There are signs of our society to come, in the attitude of the young people, seeking something they cannot quite put into words, something different. The grip of 'the talkies' in a pre TV and computer age is interesting, and the social venues of tea rooms and pubs are still recognisable.

There is a marvellous description of London in the grip of the run-up to Christmas, which applies absolutely to us now.

Account Options

It is the characters who are marvellous, though. None are glamourised, except perhaps the 'villains', yet even they are not completely dark and wicked. The cast is small, yet we feel sympathy for all the inhabitants of the office of Twigg and Dersingham, Angel Pavement. Their faults are there, yet also their humanity, their hopes, fears and ambitions. I was quite gripped and read quickly, although the outcome is not a surprise.

Definitely recommended. Apr 14, Jean rated it it was amazing Shelves: I first read this book when I was in my teens and seemed to read it at a quicker pace than I read it this time. I have a first edition hard-back published in Unlike many books written at a galloping pace today, J. Priestley's novel proceeds at a very leisurely pace.

Characterisation and dialogue are strong, allowing each of the employees in the small, struggling business in dreary Angel Pavement to be clearly drawn. When the mysterious Mr Goldspie and his pretty daughter arrive, it seems I first read this book when I was in my teens and seemed to read it at a quicker pace than I read it this time.

He discusses his immediate plans with the crew. Business has not been good, and Mr Dersingham is trying to decide whom to sack. Mr Golspie arrives with a dispatch case containing a sample book of veneers and inlays, and asks to see Mr Dersingham.

After a short delay, he is admitted to Mr Dersingham's office, and there is a long discussion, after which both men leave mysteriously. Mr Smeeth is baffled, especially when Mr Dersingham rings up and tells him to sack their senior traveller, Mr Goath. The second chapter introduces the tobacconist T. Benenden, and shows Mr Smeeth's family and home life. He wonders if Mr Dersingham's absence indicates that they are all about to lose their jobs. But at five, Mr Dersingham returns and informs Mr Smeeth that the newcomer has offered a cheap supply of veneers from the Baltic, and their immediate future is assured.

The next evening, Mr Golspie takes Mr Smeeth out for a drink at the White Horse, and tells him he ought to ask for a rise. A new typist is employed, Poppy Sellers, and Mr Dersingham invites Mr Golspie to a black tie dinner party at his home.

The party is not a success, firstly because of the incompetence of the servants and secondly because of the unexpected arrival of the daughter, Lena Golspie, who quarrels with Miss Verever and Mrs Dersingham. The fourth chapter depicts one of the miserable weekends of the lonely young clerk, Mr Turgis, who wanders around London taking in any amusements he can afford. On the Monday after, he sees Lena Golspie for the first time, and is smitten.

The fifth chapter depicts the narrow world of the typist, Miss Matfield, and her disastrous date with Norman Birtley, which is enlivened only by an accidental meeting with Mr Golspie, who gives her a box of chocolates on a whim.

Later on Mr Golspie seems even more glamorous, when, shortly before leaving for a short trip, he asks her to take down letters on board the moored steamship Lemmala, and pours her some vodka.

Mr Smeeth obtains a rise in salary, and after talking to Benenden, he celebrates by going to a concert at Queen's Hall , where he enjoys Brahms's First Symphony. On returning home he finds out that his daughter Edna has been sacked, but he is not terribly dismayed; he admits to his wife that he has been given a rise, something which he had been planning to keep secret.

On Saturday night his wife's cousin, Fred Mitty, and his family, arrive for a party, and Mr Smeeth quickly comes to loathe them after they wreck the parlour and damage some of his clothes.

Turgis has become obsessed with Lena Golspie, and jumps on a chance to see her again when he delivers some money from her father.Sort order. Dickensian in scope, Hardy-esque in plot. More information about this seller Contact this seller 8.

The author's delight in the graphic contrast between the coloured pencil lines on white and the dark shapes of the rooftops, buildings and spires is evident in these flowing page designs where drawings of drawings are absolutely believable. On the Monday after, he sees Lena Golspie for the first time, and is smitten. Angel Pavement provides readers with a vivid picture of ordinary London life before the war and the blitz changed everything dramatically and is set against the background of the great depression.

Benenden, and shows Mr Smeeth's family and home life. The final word to Blake himself, always in support of the central message of any visual arts curriculum, that it is process that is important, not replication.

Rating details. Enlarge cover.

DARIA from Virginia
Look through my other articles. One of my hobbies is orienteering. I do love reading novels bashfully .