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BHOWANI JUNCTION BOOK

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Bhowani Junction book. Read 29 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. John Masters evokes the tensions and conflicts that accompanied th. Bhowani Junction is a novel by John Masters, which was the basis of a film starring The book is set in /, shortly before India gained independence. Victoria is an Anglo-Indian, the daughter of a railwayman. Patrick Taylor. Bhowani Junction [John Masters] on ppti.info *FREE* Bhowani Junction Paperback – . I like this author but I must confess I did not like this book.


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Bhowani Junction [John Masters] on ppti.info Browse our editors' picks for the best books of the month in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books. Amongst the numerous books written about the British colonial era in the Masters' novel, Bhowani Junction () is set during the last few. But once again, for those to whom Masters is in a way today's Kipling, Bhowani Junction will carry immense appeal. Book of the Month for April means it is off to.

He perceptively captures the dilemma facing Anglo-Indians. He captures the feel of the time, the milieu and both the conflicts between and the characteristics of the different political and religious subgroups. Masters captures the feel of the different Indian communities, and this is reflected in the dialogs. Each character comes to have a distinct identity, an individual who feels genuine and real; what each says and does and feels blends perfectly.

Each has their own strengths and weaknesses.

Victoria is 28, Anglo-Indian and the daughter of a railway man. She is very attractive. She has grown up alongside Patrick Taylor, also a railway man and also Anglo-Indian. He considers Victoria his girlfriend, but there is Ranjit Kasel, a Sikh and a member of the Congress Party who hopes to marry her too!

Who will she choose - a Brit, an Anglo-Indian, an Indian or none of them? Who does she love and how does she see her future? It is the way in which the three men and Victoria are drawn that makes the book so marvelous.

I loved all of them. Each very different and each wonderfully special in their own way. Each felt genuine and real. There is humor. The Brigadier, a supporting character, will surely make you laugh.

The plot is exciting. Who is K. Roy and what terrorist action is he planning? Does he have communist affiliations? Can he be caught? How and by whom? There is a leopard hunt and a murder and accidents that lead to death. So maybe you think trains and railways are just boring stuff. Not here! We speed through a tunnel on the foot-plate in the cab of a steam locomotive.

It is sizzling hot and we hear the chug of the engine and feel the vibration and smother in the choking dust.

The experience grabs you. I highly recommend this book. You get great character portrayal, humor and a fast-paced adventure story. You come to understand how it felt to be Anglo-Indian in India in How often do you get all that?

So why not five stars? So it has to have four stars. Each one tells their portion as a first-person narrative. We are not given repeated versions of the same events, and the story does move forward chronologically. All three narrators wonderfully captured the essence of their respective character. The narration was marvelous; it could not have been better. The train episode is told with a flair.

Both the British and the Anglo-Indian dialects were perfect. You hear every word and the pauses are properly placed. I seriously think that if you possibly can you should listen to the audiobook rather than read the paper book, the narration is that good!

I believe the characters become more real as you hear them talk. Indian Summer: The Secret History of the End of an Empire is a great book if you are looking for non-fiction. View all 14 comments. Mar 06, Marcus Clark rated it really liked it. More and more are coming out each day. Publishers focus is on their current crop of books; the old ones are left to die in the wilderness.

Not because the old books are inferior, many are better — but because publishers can only promote a limited number of books. There are many wonderful, interesting, absorbing novels that have slipped off the radar. Perhaps the name was just too difficult to pronounce, but it never seemed to receive the attention it deserved. John Masters was born in Calcutta, India. The fifth generation of his family to have served in India.

The partition of India in resulted in the dissolution of the British Indian Empire and the end of the British control. The violent nature of the partition created an atmosphere of mutual hostility and suspicion between India and Pakistan. This is the background to the novel. The story is related first-hand in three separate narratives by the main figures: It is through their eyes that we see some of the personal and social problems of modern India.

It is not only the physical aspects of the story that make it interesting. The use of multiple first-person accounts gives the novel the ability to shock the reader. Each section presents their side of the story, which looks astoundingly different from the previous viewpoint. It is like reading Lawrence Durrell's The Alexandria Quartet, the panels sliding effortlessly aside to present a totally different view of events, characters, and emotions.

Each character, tells their story so convincingly that we do not suspect that there could be a different side to the events we are witnessing. Not until the end, when we start to know Patrick Taylor's idiosyncrasies. This is a story rich with interesting characters, beautifully written, with a background set in a period of revolution. Jul 13, Corto rated it liked it.

Another well-crafted novel from John Masters about the end of the British Raj, and one woman who is torn between three identities: Anglo-Indian, Indian, or "English". Rodney Savage 13th Gurkha Rifles. While the story is primarily about Jones' battle to define herself, the parallel plot concerns interna Another well-crafted novel from John Masters about the end of the British Raj, and one woman who is torn between three identities: While the story is primarily about Jones' battle to define herself, the parallel plot concerns internal security operations conducted by Savage and the search for an Indian Communist provocateur, KP Roy.

Bhowani Junction: Classic By John Masters

Masters was fascinated with trains, and the Delhi Deccan Railway and the Anglo-Indian culture that surrounded it is also central to the plot and story. Masters indirectly sheds light on the major theme of identity in this novel, later in his memoir "Pilgrim Son", where he describes his feelings on having to quit India in with some torment. After Independence he saw no place for himself in India where his family had been since the 18th century or England, and eventually he settled in America.

This struggle is echoed by each of the primary characters.

Again, Masters is a bit paternalistic and dismissive of the Indian passion for independence. He seems to grudgingly accept Anglo-Indians this may not be fair, and I would like to see someone else's perspective on this and saves his deepest respect for the Gurkhas, Sikhs, and the Indians who allied themselves with the British. Very well written, and exciting to the end.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Re-visit via film: Ava Gardner Victoria Jones Stewart Granger Rodney Savage Bill Travers Patrick Taylor Abraham Sofaer Surabhai Francis Matthews Ranjit Kasel Marne Maitland Govindaswami Peter Illing Ghanshyam Edward Chapman Thomas Jones Freda Jackson The Sandani Lionel Jeffries Graham McDaniel Alan Tilvern Anglo-Indian Patrick pursues the daughter of a train driver.

Anglo-Indian Victoria seeks her true identity amid Britain's turbulent withdrawal. Victoria Jones becomes drawn to the Indian way of life, and Ranjit in particular. Unrest grows in Bhowani as Victoria Jones comes under suspicion from the police.

Laura, Laura, look at this The Deceivers Pierce Brosnan William Savage Shashi Kapoor Raja Chandra Singh Saeed Jaffrey Hussein Helena Michell Sarah Wilson Keith Michell Colonel Wilson David Robb George Anglesmith View all 6 comments. The Anglo-Indians, that is to say Indians who have some 'white blood' in their ancestry, were looked down on by the Europeans and other Indians alike.

This is well described in the book.

Many Anglo-Indians had jobs in the Indian railway system. Bhowani Junction is a railway junction somewhere in Ind [I read this book about 18 months ago, so I have forgotten many details, but I retain a good overall impression of it.

Bhowani Junction

Bhowani Junction is a railway junction somewhere in India. Most of the main characters in the book are railway employees who lived there. The tale begins in the years leading up to Indian Independence in Early in the story, one of the Anglo-Indian drivers takes his British superiors to investigate one such incident. Soon after this, the daughter of one of the Anglo-Indian railway officials visits the Indian part of the town, and thus begins her liaison with an Indian revolutionary.

The novel presents much insight into the lives of Anglo-Indian community, and how its members were viewed by Indians and their British colonizers.

Whilst I was reading the book, I kept having a sneaking suspicion that John Masters, like many others who were not Anglo-Indians, was somewhat scornful of this 'mixed-race' community, and that upset me a little.

View 2 comments. Jul 07, Michael rated it really liked it. Set in India in , the story revolves around the dilemma that was facing the Anglo-India people descendants of mixed race as the British indicated their willingness to grant independence to India. The four main characters each tell their story in separate sections, not as flashbacks but in a serial progression so the story advances steadily as it explores the problems that Indian, Anglo-Indian and British experienced during extreme political and religious sectarianism that was ravaging Indi Set in India in , the story revolves around the dilemma that was facing the Anglo-India people descendants of mixed race as the British indicated their willingness to grant independence to India.

The four main characters each tell their story in separate sections, not as flashbacks but in a serial progression so the story advances steadily as it explores the problems that Indian, Anglo-Indian and British experienced during extreme political and religious sectarianism that was ravaging India at that time. Victoria, a youngish rather beautiful Anglo-Indian woman is whom the story focuses upon. She is uncertain as to what direction her future holds, for the Anglo-Indians thought of themselves as part of the British supremacy and by default superior to the full-blooded Indians.

Each person is very well described, as are their relationships as they all revolve around, and involve, Victoria. I enjoyed the story apart from a few sections where I felt that the author lapsed in his thought descriptions about Victoria and and her commander Robert. An interesting read.

Oct 06, Gerald Sinstadt rated it it was amazing Shelves: Bhowani Junction, set in India at the ti,me of Independence, confronts many difficult issues with intelligence, honesty and a gift for story-telling that complements understanding.

The author, like one of his major characters, was a colonel in the Indian army. How much of himself can be read into Colonel Rodney Savage, in charge of a regiment of Gurkhas, is impossible to say, but this is a balanced portrait man aware of his own strengths and weaknesses. The daily life of a railway station is drawn Bhowani Junction, set in India at the ti,me of Independence, confronts many difficult issues with intelligence, honesty and a gift for story-telling that complements understanding.

The daily life of a railway station is drawn in authoritative fashion, as are the political factions and the ever-present threat of violence. Above all,this is a novel about the ambivalence of the Anglo-Indian community.

These are people coping with normal human emotions while at the same time finding themselves neither truly English not authentically Indian. Masters has written many novels about this era ina huge nation's history, but in Bhowani Junction he seems to have determined that this will be his magnum opus.

In this, he largely succeeds, leaving the reader to admire the sympathy and insight of one who was there, saw it all, and cared deeply.

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A word of praise,too, for the reader in the audio version. That, too, has the airof a labour of love. Jan 29, Judy rated it liked it. Do they follow their overlords to "Home," which they have never seen, and be subject to flagrant discrimination, or do they stay in India, subject to the Indians that they have always scorned?

The main character, Victoria, explores her options as she spurns her hapless Anglo-Indian suitor, betroths herself to and then abandons an Indian national, beds down with a British officer, before As the Brits are departing from India post-WWII, the Anglo-Indians are left in a state of great uncertainty.

The main character, Victoria, explores her options as she spurns her hapless Anglo-Indian suitor, betroths herself to and then abandons an Indian national, beds down with a British officer, before her final decision is made evident in the novel's last sentence.

Published in , Bhowani Junction is part intrigue, as Indians begin their own violent struggle against each other for power, part Mad Men, for its attitude toward women.

Oct 15, Tom rated it really liked it. This was a very engaging tale set during post war India at the eve of Indian independence from British rule. The focal point is the railroad terminal and town , Bhowani Junction.

The plot revolves around the various characters ; English,Indian,and Anglo Indian coming to terms with their place in what will be the new India.

The action is fueled by their interconnectedness to seeing to the safe running of this terminus which is threatened by violent elements of the Indian independence movement.

Th This was a very engaging tale set during post war India at the eve of Indian independence from British rule.

The author John Masters lived and served in India at the time which helps makes this a very real and flavorful story. The book was adapted for film and in my opinion a fine rendering , staring Ava Gardner and Stewart Granger-shot on location.

Feb 23, Caroline rated it liked it Shelves: This book didn't age as well as I'd hoped. I'd read it years and years ago as a young girl, but now I am older I found it full of sexism and prejudice.

I am sure that it is of its time but it jarred with me.

Apr 21, Laura rated it really liked it Recommends it for: John Masters' continuing saga of the Savage family serving in the British army in India. Nov 13, Nitya Sivasubramanian rated it did not like it Shelves: I am well aware that often a reader must forgive an author for language or opinions that are offensive when they were written at a time when such things were acceptable. But can we please shelve this book somewhere in the backroom where they've tossed Birth of a Nation and all the other racist dross?

I actually picked this up because I was curious to read about the experience of Indian independence from the point of view of an Anglo-Indian. But obviously I hadn't done my research because r I am well aware that often a reader must forgive an author for language or opinions that are offensive when they were written at a time when such things were acceptable. But obviously I hadn't done my research because reading this book felt like reading what an Englishman thought an Anglo-Indian ought to think about India and Indians.

And I accept that even today, there are those who cannot seem to grasp that although they self-identify with the ruling class, they are in no way accepted as such by the establishment, ie. Indians for Trump. Patrick Taylor would have walked away from a conversation with me with two black eyes and a bleeding nose.

Victoria would have been told to grow up and make a choice. Ranjit needs to aim higher and Rodney a little lower. Jai Hind! Apr 03, Kerry rated it liked it.

I wanted to read the book after watching the movie with Ava Gardner and Stewart Granger. It's a big novel about a complex period in Indian history, not easy for a novice like me to follow.

Savage is, like John Masters, not only a professional soldier but also a member of a British family who have for generations served in India. Victoria originally dislikes Savage as hard and cruel but eventually becomes both his lover and his unofficial adjutant in the last hectic days of British rule in India. But in the end she realises that she cannot escape her origins, and—rejecting both the Indian man and the British one—chooses Patrick, an Anglo-Indian like herself.

Rodney Savage recognises that he is losing out to his social and intellectual inferior, but realises that he is powerless to prevent it. Patrick for his part begins to realise that, in the new India, his children might have a chance of becoming anyone they want to, rather than having to stick to the Anglo-Indians' traditional role of working on the railways. Themes[ edit ] The central theme of the novel, epitomised by Victoria's own dilemma between her competing suitors, is the conflicting pressures upon the mixed-race Anglo-Indian community as Independence approaches, not confident of "fitting in" either in a Britain most of them have never seen, or in an independent India.

Another important theme in the novel is the significance of the developing Cold War for post- colonial India. The British are resigned to leaving the country, but are desperate to have an influence on India's future, in particularly by averting the threat of a Communist takeover. Throughout the book the British are shown striving to support and sustain the Congress Party and its leader Gandhi , who for so long they had vilified and imprisoned.

In one passage the British character Rodney Savage reflects upon the irony of his being charged with protecting Gandhi against a terrorist assassination attempt. According to Masters, writing in the Glossary to his earlier novel, Nightrunners of Bengal , Bhowani is an "imaginary town.

To get a geographical bearing on the story it should be imagined to be about where Jhansi really is - Small amounts of chipping and closed tears. Ava Gardner Foreign Publisher.

Who does she love and how does she see her future? Well worth a read but beware the racist language. For information on how we process your data, read our Privacy Policy. Because yes, it is that good. Published by Michael Joseph, London All three principle characters are very well drawn and contrasted.

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