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Son of Hamas: A Gripping Account of Terror, Betrayal, Political Intrigue, and Unthinkable Choices by Mosab Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. Son of Hamas is now available with an all-new chapter about events since the books release such as the revelation of Mosabs Israeli intelligence handlers true . 2 days ago Mosab Hassan Yousef has had an inside view of the deadly terrorist group Hamas. The oldest son of Sheikh Hassan Yousef, a founding.


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Son of Hamas: A Gripping Account of Terror, Betrayal, Political Intrigue, and Unthinkable Choices EPUB ebook. By Author: Mosab Hassan Yousef, Ron Brackin. Son of Hamas: A Gripping Account of Terror, Betrayal, Political Intrigue, and Unthinkable Choices - eBook Tyndale Momentum / / ePub. 5 out of 5 stars. Son of Hamas book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Since he was a small boy, Mosab Hassan Yousef has had an inside view.

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Son of Hamas: A Gripping Account of Terror, Betrayal, Political I...

See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Jun 28, An eye-opening insight into the mind and motives of Islamic terrorists with the true story of Mosab Hassan Yousef, the son of a founder leader of Hamas.

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Son of Hamas

Why not share! An annual anal Embed Size px. Start on. Show related SlideShares at end. WordPress Shortcode. Published in: All in all, I don't know what to make of this book. As a Jew living in Israel it's pretty clear where my sympathies lie; it's always validating to hear about someone rejecting your enemy and joining your side, and many of Mosab's statements about peace and Israel were gratifying to hear, especially considering where he was coming from. I just wish I found his story more credible.

Oct 27, Megan Larson rated it really liked it Shelves: It's hard to know where to start in reviewing this controversial book about a controversial part of the world and a controversial choice made by its author, but the number of stars should be a hint. I came to this book with little other than a cursory knowledge of the tenets of Islam and the intricate workings of the Middle East conflict, and eager to learn. I was most interested, as a Christian, to read how a son of Hamas came to a place where he was willing to renounce not only terrorism but I It's hard to know where to start in reviewing this controversial book about a controversial part of the world and a controversial choice made by its author, but the number of stars should be a hint.

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I was most interested, as a Christian, to read how a son of Hamas came to a place where he was willing to renounce not only terrorism but Islam in order to become a follower of Christ. I have read reviews criticizing one aspect or another of this memoir--either feeling he left out important information or questioning his motives for writing. I feel that's to be expected with a book like this, and would encourage prospective readers to read it and decide on their own.

This is Mosab's story, and I think it is a good one, but I also see it as an amazing story of sovereign God gathering His people from every tribe, tongue, and nation. View 1 comment. May 29, Tempe Lohmeyer rated it it was amazing. This is a fascinating book written by the son of one of the founders of the Hamas, a Palestinian terror organization.

It chronicles his youth as the son of a devout Muslim iman, to his years in prison, then follows his years as a spy for Israel. Mosab's autobiography reads like a spy thriller. He was uniquely positioned to see the inner workings of the Palestinian terror organizations plus the inner world of the Israeli FBI. The book is interesting on two fronts: First, it is an inside view on t This is a fascinating book written by the son of one of the founders of the Hamas, a Palestinian terror organization.

First, it is an inside view on the founding and politics of the Hamas. Secondly, and to me most importantly, it chronicles how the son of Hamas changes from an angry, hate-filled youth to a young man trying to love his enemy and save untold lives from terrorism because he was introduced to the love, grace, and forgiveness of Jesus.

Jesus changed his life - he gave up his family and his country to live out the life Jesus calls us to live. Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be sons of your Father in heaven.

He gathers every scrap of information he can to help the Israeli Shin Bet Intelligence Service stop the blood bath. Apr 06, Stephen Phillips rated it it was amazing Shelves: It is important to understand the Arab-Israeli conflict, for it is at the literal and figurative center of religious and political strife today. Son of Hamas gives the reader a ground view of this conflict from to through the eyes of its author, Mosab Hassan Yousef.

Balancing these two whether patro It is important to understand the Arab-Israeli conflict, for it is at the literal and figurative center of religious and political strife today. Balancing these two whether patrolling the streets of Ramallah or incarcerated in the Israeli prison system was daunting and dangerous. Keeping up his two personas became even more complicated when Yousef was introduced to, and eventually converted to Christianity. Son of Hamas is an important book for those who are interested in intelligence, particularly human intelligence, and an imperative for any studying international relations or security issues.

A well written account with Ron Brackin, it is a quick read and will provide invaluable anecdotes of the human condition that can be referred to again and again. Oct 05, Lisa rated it liked it. I would never have picked up this book to read on my own.

I'm so glad it was a bookclub book.

I've always been sort of pro-Israel when hearing about events in the conflict between them and the Palestinians. Why can't they finally have a country of their own?

And what better place than their original spot? Reading this book was such an education. To see things from the point of view of a Palestinian who ended up not hating I would never have picked up this book to read on my own. To see things from the point of view of a Palestinian who ended up not hating Jews, and who eventually converts to Christianity, made his side of the story credible and relatable to me.

The Jews are sort of treating the Palestinians the way they had been treated for so long - an oversimplification, I understand, but still. I have more love and understanding for both sides of the conflict now. The fact that the author had come from such a devout Muslim family and discovered more love, tolerance, and peace in the New Testament than he'd ever known in his previous religion strengthens my own desire to follow Jesus Christ.

I'm so glad I read this book. Jun 19, John Gardner rated it really liked it. This book is proof that truth can be more exciting as well. Mosab Hassan Yousef is the son of Sheikh Hassan Yousef, one of the founders of Hamas, an Islamic resistance movement which has been classified as a terrorist organization. Agreeing to work with his hated enemies against the family and community he loved was no simple choice.

His motivation was to help stop the senseless violence, particularly after seeing that what he had believed about Arabs and Jews was not the full truth.

Nothing is black-and-white. The fight between Israelis and Palestinians is not the fight of good vs. For years he struggled to reconcile enemies, even before he came to recognize that Jesus was more than simply a prophet. Eventually he came to believe that Christ was God Himself, and Mosab was secretly baptized. The solution to the conflict in the Middle East is neither religious nor political, and peace will not come through violence. The only way for a true peace in the Holy Land is for there to be a great outpouring of the Holy Spirit over those people, and for Israelis and Arabs alike to come to see the Prince of Peace as Lord and Savior.

In the words of the author: The challenge is to be the first courageous enough to embrace it. Mosab Hassan Yousef suffered great personal expense — his family has disowned him and he is marked for death should he ever return home — to share his message.

May we all come to share his heart-brokenness over the spiritual condition of Jews and Muslims, and over the violent effects of sin in his homeland. Son of Hamas is probably the most important book I've read this year. It's an autobiography account Mosab Yousef, eldest son of one of the founders of the terrorist organization Hamas, and an extraordinary insider's view of the infamous organization.

According to Yousef, Hamas didn't begin as a terrorist organization. In fact, his father isn't a terrorist in one sense Yousef is at pains to paint his father as a man who doesn't engage in or actively encourage acts of terror , but rather a benign Son of Hamas is probably the most important book I've read this year. In fact, his father isn't a terrorist in one sense Yousef is at pains to paint his father as a man who doesn't engage in or actively encourage acts of terror , but rather a benign and beloved Muslim leader with a deep concern and love for his family and his people.

And yet Yousef comes to see the issue is more complicated as his father while not involved in violence, has passively condoned it and been manipulated by Hamas and the PLO, it should be said to serve the ends of those within the organization.

Yousef explains this dichotomy through what he calls 'the ladder of Islam' by which otherwise good people become radicalised over time. It's evident that in the case of Hamas, some of this had to do with Israeli responses to to Palestine.

However, where as the PLO was essentially a nationalistic organization seeking an independent Palestinian state, Hamas is a religious organization fundamentally opposed to the existence of Israel. And, of course, there is the corruption of men within both organizations who have a vested interest in the violence continuing.

This is one of the great gifts of the Son of Hamas. Yousef says he wrote it, in part, to help outsiders understand the intractability of the Middle East problem. Humanly speaking, there doesn't appear to be a solution. Ultimately, however we are left with hope, not in human success, but that a man like Yousef, who had great influence and was himself a wannabe terrorist, could come to love his enemy, Israel, through kindness displayed by his enemies and in spite of their cruelty at earlier times , and most importantly, by discovering the love of Christ.

Most of the book is not about his Christianity but his life as a son of Hamas and how came to, in the eyes of those people, betray the organization. His faith is important, but emerges as part of the fabric of his story. He went for years falling in love, first with Christ's teachings, and only later Christ himself.

Nevertheless, this had a fundamental affect on his life. After he started working with Shin Bet, the Israeli secret service, he would only pass on information about terrorists if they promised to arrest rather than assassinate their targets. Yousef gives many insights into the origins not only of Hamas, but of the Palestinian intifadas, the PLO he has no time for the organisation or the late Arafat, who he claims had a couple of opportunities to broker peace but had a vested interest in violence , and numerous events surrounding the last 30 years of the Palestinian story.

One man's perspective, no doubt, but a unique and valuable one. Nevertheless, I highly recommend it. Feb 01, Lydia rated it really liked it Shelves: I have been wanting to read this book for a while now. It was probably a year ago that I heard Yousef speak at a live gathering, and I was intrigued then. The pace of the narrative, and the matter-of-fact way it is presented, make it easy to forget that this is an autobiography. It's hard for a Westerner like myself to realize things like torture, interrogation, and bullet dodging are actually a reality for some people.

The greatest thing I was able to take away from this book was a deeper under I have been wanting to read this book for a while now.

The greatest thing I was able to take away from this book was a deeper understanding of the human element of the Palestinian land crises. Furthermore, I was able to see how corruption can occur.

Think about it - if a leader builds his empire on political strife and violence, how can he maintain his leadership in a time of peace, when his platform ideas and leadership skill set are now obsolete? Would it not make sense for him to spur on toward more violence and political strife, as a means of self preservation?

Furthermore, a picture was painted of the deep confusion that can occur between religious beliefs and fanaticism when political powers become involved. It should be remembered that this narrative is indeed one man's opinion and experience, therefore bias may unwittingly develop. However, if this tale is completely true, Yousef's realm of experience includes being the son of a founder of Hamas, face to face interactions with Yasser Arafat, imprisonment and torture, working as a double agent for the Shin Bet Israeli secret security agency , and a slow, much deliberated and methodical conversion to Christianity, which ultimately leads him to flee to the U.

I would say he is somewhat of an authority on the matter. View all 3 comments. Mar 07, Lydia Presley rated it it was amazing Shelves: The title of this book describes exactly what it is. It is a gripping, powerful, terrifying tale of unbelievable choices, political intrigue and betrayal of the most potent sort. What is Hamas? It is an Islamic resistance movement in the West Bank and Gaza, listed by several organizat The title of this book describes exactly what it is. It is an Islamic resistance movement in the West Bank and Gaza, listed by several organizations and governments as a terrorist organization.

My Aunt bought this book and read it quickly and I couldn't resist the pull of it. I remembered reading about Mosab Now Joseph in an article a few months back and thought how fascinating his story must be. Fascinating doesn't even begin to describe this journey. There are facts and facts laid bare in this book.

I don't even know where to begin writing about it. The relationship Mosab has with his father is one that defies all typical American assumptions when it comes to terrorist relationships. Despite his father's heavy involvement in Hamas, he proves that the line is not always black and white and that there is a wide expanse of gray there in the middle.

While his father does not participate first-hand in the terrorist acts nor actively condone them he does nothing to stop them which causes Mosab to have one of many second thoughts as to his place in the conflict. Most of all, this is a story of salvation - although it begins to get a bit lost. This is not a book that preaches to you.

It's a simple statement of fact from a man raised in a deeply religious, Muslim family and lifestyle and how he struggles with the differences between the God of the Bible and the God of the Qur'an. An example is this paragraph: I wasn't even a Christian yet, and al-Faransi certainly didn't know the Lord.

My Christian friends were praying for me every day, however. And God, Jesus said in Matthew 5: In this section of the book Mosab is speaking of an Israeli man, a Jewish man Amnon who refuses to serve in the military despite it being a required 3 year term. The reason for Amnon's refusal? He cannot justify killing. What I didn't realize was that Amnon was living in the Jewish section of the prison the entire time I was at Ofer.

He was there because he refused to work with the Israelis; I was there because I had agreed to work with them. I was trying to protect Jews; he was trying to protect Palestinians. I didn't believe that everybody in Israel and the occupied territories needed to become a Christian in order to end the bloodshed.

But I thought if we just had a thousand Amnons on one side and a thousand Mosabs on the other, it would make a big difference. And if we had more His father refuses to denounce him in order to protect him from death.

His father denies that Mosab ever had any information about Hamas and was not a member of the organization. I don't know whether this is the truth or not, but I do know that what I have read in this novel shed a definite light on some things and made me think long and hard about a situation which, up until this point, was dark and mysterious.

I applaud Mosab's courage in telling his story and I am thrilled at the message that he conveys through it. If only we had a thousand people to listen and take up his way of thinking just think what we could do. And like he said in this book, "if we had more Dec 15, Laura rated it it was amazing. Mosab begins his book with a letter to his family, acknowledging the pain, deep wounds, and separation he has caused by his choices. Had he stayed and become a terrorist, he would have gained the status of hero, dedicated to his faith, family and nation.

Instead, he is now considered a traitor in their eyes, bringing shame instead of pride. Once a royal prince, he is now a stranger in a for Mosab begins his book with a letter to his family, acknowledging the pain, deep wounds, and separation he has caused by his choices.

Once a royal prince, he is now a stranger in a foreign country, fighting loneliness and darkness. But saving even one innocent human life brings him hope.

He divulges his own behind-the-scenes involvement with Hamas, starting out innocently by throwing rocks. His vivid descriptions about dealings with top Middle Eastern leaders give the reader the impression of being there with him, yet sitting safely at home. He goes on to elaborates about the difficult choices he had to make as a young teen and young man, and how it changed his life, family, history, and nation—heart-wrenching decisions. Mosab exposes information known only by a few individuals, but he does it for the greater good of all nations involved.

In his postscript, he admonishes Christians to love people unconditionally in order to represent Jesus to the world. A deep longing for this freedom is at the heart of his story.

I believe this is a book that should be read by our top government officials our President on down to help them understand the Middle Eastern mindset, as well as assist in working through the terrorism issues throughout this section of the world and worldwide.

I greatly appreciated his glossary and time line at the end of his book. To learn more information, news and updates from Mosab Hassan Yousef, please visit here. This book was provided by Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

Mar 30, Dergrossest rated it did not like it. Either way, it is total crap. The purported author is the son of a founding member of Hamas and his muse has connections to the Washington Times — I guess I should have known what I was in store for once I learned that the Moonies were involved. And is the author unaware that Islam had already spread to the plains of Spain, the coast of China and the jungles of Africa by AD, more than years before anyone had ever heard of the Turks?

First, the author suggests that Islam is a fundamentally dangerous religion completely incompatible with peaceful co-existence, which is completely contrary to most of the history of the Ottoman Empire itself and that of modern Moslem life in the US. Second, the author makes the wild claim that the most dangerous Moslems are the moderate Moslems because one never knows when they will spontaneously radicalize, as if our Islamic neighbors and co-workers are like recently unburied World War II ordinance that might go off at any time.

This is the type of zealotry to be expected by a recent convert to Christianity, but that doesn't make his wild claims any easier to stomach. I could go on as to the many ways that this book is a complete joke, including its turgid writing style. However, perhaps the most damning condemnation I can make is to list some of the Congresspersons who apparently supported granting this buffoon refugee status in the US: Anything else you need to know?

Jul 08, David rated it liked it Shelves: Apparently this book was a best seller and caused all kinds of waves when it was published. I must live under a rock because I never heard of it, though I vaguely remember hearing something about the author possibly being deported he wasn't. Anyway, I caught it on the Kindle for like one dollar and it looked interesting. It was interesting. Parts of it were fascinating. When Mosab stuck to telling of his relationship with his father, a major Hamas leader, and of his spiritual journey to Christi Apparently this book was a best seller and caused all kinds of waves when it was published.

When Mosab stuck to telling of his relationship with his father, a major Hamas leader, and of his spiritual journey to Christianity, it was engaging. But after a while the spy stories of intrigue and close escapes got kind of tiring. I did enjoy reading of Mosab getting involved with the Israeli spy agency and his work there. The problem was at times this almost overwhelmed the rest of the story. I guess I was not sure if this was a spiritual biography in the model of Augustine's Confessions or a spy thriller like the Bourne Identity of which I have not read the book, only seen the movie.

Overall, it was a good read. His uncovering of some of the slimy moves by people like Arafat shows the depths of evil in these situations and how those of us living thousands of miles away and watching the news need to be careful which news we trust. Finally, Mosab offered evidence of the accuracy of his story from his courtroom hearing to be deported, his friendship with his Israeli handler. But after Three Cups of Tea, I can't help but wonder if any of this story was embellished to just sound cooler.

I hope not. Mar 24, Veronica rated it it was amazing. I can't remember running out and getting a book hot off the shelf like I did with this book and it lived up to every penny.

First of all if you are any bit interested in the complicated middle east conflict this book will educate you on the war that won't end. This isn't a simple political conflict, this is a vast web of history, faith, family and land.

He shares his unique experience, as son of Hamas as he grows in his new found faith and also journeys through the sad reality that Islam will ne I can't remember running out and getting a book hot off the shelf like I did with this book and it lived up to every penny. He shares his unique experience, as son of Hamas as he grows in his new found faith and also journeys through the sad reality that Islam will never allow or peaceably co-exist with Israel.

I was struck by the sophisticated intelligence forces of Israel and how well they know their enemy. Also fascinating is his story of conversion. How he found Christ and the real truth is a great story of faith and is a reminder that of Eph.

I love how he was able to cross reference the God of Islam with the God of Christianity and find truth. It was well written and took me about three days from cover to cover. I also appreciated the references in the back. All in all, gripping. A Great read. View all 4 comments. Sep 24, Mike rated it it was ok Shelves: I wasn't optimistic about reading a true story when the young man says on page 10 that the Arabs lost because they were outgunned and outnumbered in the First Arab-Israeli War in But on the next page he begins to talk about the psychology of Islamic extremism and redeems his story a bit.

The book is an easy read and, if the events related are reasonably accurate, he has an interesting story. He whitewashes much of the Palestinian terror actions and paints Israelis in a bad light in most si I wasn't optimistic about reading a true story when the young man says on page 10 that the Arabs lost because they were outgunned and outnumbered in the First Arab-Israeli War in He whitewashes much of the Palestinian terror actions and paints Israelis in a bad light in most situations.

Yet he becomes a spy for the Shin Bet and provides intelligence for several years on the actions of Hamas high level operatives. A conversion from Islam to Christianity certainly makes his eventual path clear, he has to leave. Aug 04, David Johnston rated it it was amazing. It seemed to flow pretty well. It may seem a bit disjointed because it was obvious he wasn't telling the whole story.

He left a lot out and changed names and places. If he really was a Shin Bet spy, then much of his story is classified. This may be a spoiler if you have not read it all, but he becomes a Christian, is baptized, resigns from Shin Bet and immigrates to the U. The fact that he gets through security so easily and into the U.

I find it entirely plausible either way. After he has been here for a while and is writing his book and applies for political asylum is when Homeland Security leaps into belated, vigilant action and threatens to deport him.

He gave them a manuscript copy of his book to help explain his situation. I guess that is when they found out he was the son of one of the founders of Hamas and had aided and abetted in their eyes palestinian terrorists. This part of the book rings all too true for me. After telling them that he had been an Israeli spy posing as a terrorist himself I can imagine Homeland Security saying, "Mr. Yousef, we are going to have to deport you because we have discovered you are the the son of one of the founders of Hamas and gave suicide bombers a ride to a safe house.

It was in my book. Mosab's father disowns him when he finds out he has become a Christian and his day is ruined further when he discovers that Mosab had been an Israeli spy. To be disowned by one's family means any muslim has the right to kill you on sight. That also rings true.

The description of his conversion and his comments on the Bible also seem to be in keeping with his experience. At the time of his writing his story he was still a relatively new Christian and not very theologically savvy like most Americans , but seems orthodox. You notice that he is careful not to name the Christian group he was affiliated with or any of the members of the Bible study he went to even though they were his good friends.

The gal that baptized him is not described at all. All he says is she is an American, maybe from California. The middle east is still a dangerous place and Jerusalem, where the Bible study and his Christian friends ostensibly were, is not that far from the Hamas School for Murder, Mayhem and Terror whose specialty is dismembering children and old people and who enjoy killing Christians almost as much as Jews.

One thing about his story that sort of puzzles me is his apparent ease of movement from the P. When the second intifada started he was camping with his Christian friends by the Sea of Galilee I think.

Again, I think some things are left unexplained on purpose. After the intifada that ceased, of course. His story is remarkable because of its rarity.And is the author unaware that Islam had already spread to the plains of Spain, the coast of China and the jungles of Africa by AD, more than years before anyone had ever heard of the Turks? I want the facts not this soft, biased pap. Or is it to be the Hamas solution as in their Charter, drive them all into Red Sea, kill them, finish Hitler's Holocaust?

What other nation would accept millions of people? I guess that is when they found out he was the son of one of the founders of Hamas and had aided and abetted in their eyes palestinian terrorists. In some ways.

TYRON from Delaware
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