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The full text of Howard Zinn's superb people's history of the United States, spanning over years from Columbus's "discovery" of America in. This public document was automatically mirrored from ppti.infoal filename: A People's History of the United States - Zinn, ppti.info URL. A people's history of the United States [electronic resource (EPUB eBook)]: -present / Howard Zinn. Since its original landmark publication in


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A People's History of the United States (eBook, ePUB) - Zinn, Howard . As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of our country's greatest battles—the fights for a. A Peoples History of the United States - Zinn_ Howard - dokument [*.epub] A to the Clinton presidency in " By HOWARD ZINN A People's History of the. Download PDF A Young People's History o Full Page {PDF EBOOK EPUB to the War on Terror (For Young People Series) by Howard Zinn in format E-PUB.

Requires Adobe Digital Editions reader go to the download page for this title to download the free software. Terms Governing Use and Reproduction: For digital rights information refer to the download page for this title.

Author Notes: A committed radical historian and activist, Howard Zinn approaches the study of the past from the point of view of those whom he feels have been exploited by the powerful. Zinn was born in Brooklyn, New York in After working in local shipyards during his teens, he joined the U.

He received a Ph. The New Abolitionists He also became an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War, writing Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal and visiting Hanoi to receive the first American prisoners released by the North Vietnamese. Zinn's best-known and most-praised work, as well as his most controversial, is A People's History of the United States It explores American history under the thesis that most historians have favored those in power, leaving another story untold.

Zinn discusses such topics as Native American views of Columbus and the socialist and anarchist opposition to World War I in examining his theory that historical change is most often due to "mass movements of ordinary people. Bowker Author Biography Howard Zinn grew up in the immigrant slums of Brooklyn, where he worked in shipyards in his late teens.

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He saw combat duty as an air force bombardier in World War II, and afterward received his doctorate in history from Columbia University. If it's your first time on the site, or you're looking for something specific, it can be difficult to know where to start. Luckily, there's a range of ways you can filter the library content to suit your needs, from casual browsing to researching a particular topic.

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Columbus, The Indians, and Human Progress 2.

Currently Reading: Une histoire populaire des Etats-Unis -Howard Zinn.epub

Drawing the Color Line 3. Persons of Mean and Vile Condition 4. Tyranny is Tyranny 5. A kind of Revolution 6. The Intimately Oppressed 7. The Other Civil War Robber Barons And Rebels The Empire and the People The Socialist Challenge War Is the Health of the State Self-help in Hard Times The Arawaks lived in village communes, had a developed agriculture of corn, yams, cassava.

They could spin and weave, but they had no horses or work animals.

They had no iron, but they wore tiny gold ornaments in their ears. This was to have enormous consequences: He then sailed to what is now Cuba, then to Hispaniola the island which today consists of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. There, bits of visible gold in the rivers, and a gold mask presented to Columbus by a local Indian chief, led to wild visions of gold fields.

On Hispaniola, out of timbers from the Santa Maria, which had run aground, Columbus built a fort, the first European military base in the Western Hemisphere.

He called it Navidad Christmas and left thirty-nine crewmembers there, with instructions to find and store the gold. He took more Indian prisoners and put them aboard his two remaining ships. At one part of the island he got into a fight with Indians who refused to trade as many bows and arrows as he and his men wanted.

Two were run through with swords and bled to death. Then the Nina and the Pinta set sail for the Azores and Spain.

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When the weather turned cold, the Indian prisoners began to die. Columbus's report to the Court in Madrid was extravagant. He insisted he had reached Asia it was Cuba and an island off the coast of China Hispaniola.

His descriptions were part fact, part fiction: Hispaniola is a miracle.

Mountains and hills, plains and pastures, are both fertile and beautiful There are many spices, and great mines of gold and other metals The Indians, Columbus reported, "are so naive and so free with their possessions that no one who has not witnessed them would believe it.

When you ask for something they have, they never say no. To the contrary, they offer to share with anyone The aim was clear: They went from island to island in the Caribbean, taking Indians as captives. But as word spread of the Europeans' intent they found more and more empty villages. On Haiti, they found that the sailors left behind at Fort Navidad had been killed in a battle with the Indians, after they had roamed the island in gangs looking for gold, taking women and children as slaves for sex and labor.

Now, from his base on Haiti, Columbus sent expedition after expedition into the interior. They found no gold fields, but had to fill up the ships returning to Spain with some kind of dividend. In the year , they went on a great slave raid, rounded up fifteen hundred Arawak men, women, and children, put them in pens guarded by Spaniards and dogs, then picked the five hundred best specimens to load onto ships.

Of those five hundred, two hundred died en route. The rest arrived alive in Spain and were put up for sale by the archdeacon of the town, who reported that, although the slaves were "naked as the day they were born," they showed "no more embarrassment than animals.

And so Columbus, desperate to pay back dividends to those who had invested, had to make good his promise to fill the ships with gold. In the province of Cicao on Haiti, where he and his men imagined huge gold fields to exist, they ordered all persons fourteen years or older to collect a certain quantity of gold every three months. When they brought it, they were given copper tokens to hang around their necks.

Indians found without a copper token had their hands cut off and bled to death. The Indians had been given an impossible task.

The only gold around was bits of dust garnered from the streams. So they fled, were hunted down with dogs, and were killed. Trying to put together an army of resistance, the Arawaks faced Spaniards who had armor, muskets, swords, horses. When the Spaniards took prisoners they hanged them or burned them to death. Among the Arawaks, mass suicides began, with cassava poison. Infants were killed to save them from the Spaniards.

In two years, through murder, mutilation, or suicide, half of the , Indians on Haiti were dead. When it became clear that there was no gold left, the Indians were taken as slave labor on huge estates, known later as encomiendas.

They were worked at a ferocious pace, and died by the thousands. By the year , there were perhaps fifty thousand Indians left.

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By , there were five hundred. A report of the year shows none of the original Arawaks or their descendants left on the island. The chief source-and, on many matters the only source-of information about what happened on the islands after Columbus came is Bartolome de las Casas, who, as a young priest, participated in the conquest of Cuba.

For a time he owned a plantation on which Indian slaves worked, but he gave that up and became a vehement critic of Spanish cruelty.

Las Casas transcribed Columbus's journal and, in his fifties, began a multivolume History of the Indies. In it, he describes the Indians.

They are agile, he says, and can swim long distances, especially the women.In contrast, the great majority of the evidence provided by Johnson seems highly convincing and is very suitable for backing up his arguments. The Clinton Presidency and the Crisis of Democracy So, Las Casas reports, "they suffered and died in the mines and other labors in desperate silence, knowing not a soul in the world to whom they could turn for help. History Howard United States Peoples.

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