ppti.info Biography Samrat Ashok Story In Hindi Pdf

SAMRAT ASHOK STORY IN HINDI PDF

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DownloadSamrat ashoka history in hindi pdf. Auch zum Scannen von Dias. Bruce Berman - Making Innovation Pay. org, the website of the Nobel Peace. Prize. RAJA ASHOKA. In your opinion, what are the qualities a good king should pos- sess? Have you ever heard or read about a good king? You have seen these. Ashoka The great, download Hindi PDF, free hindi books. Hindi novels, Hindi books, Ncert Textbooks, Hindi story books, Cbse Textbooks, Astrology Ashoka was a great king of India. Name of the book - Samrat Ashoka.


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Samrat Ashok (a Biography) (Gujarati) Paperback Books- Buy Samrat Ashok (a Biography) (Gujarati) Books online at lowest price with Rating & Reviews, Free. Samrat Ashok (सम्राट अशोक) by Premchandra 'Mahesh' ebook pdf. Biraz Bohu by Sharat Chandra Chattopadhyay Hindi ebook pdf. Sambhog Se Children Story Book, Ebook Pdf, Book Jacket, Childrens Books, Book Cover Art. Ashoka sometimes Ashoka the Great, was an Indian emperor of the Maurya Dynasty, who ruled .. The reign of Ashoka Maurya might have disappeared into history as the ages passed by, .. hosted by actor-director Anupam Kher on Hindi news channel ABP News. Create a book · Download as PDF · Printable version.

May all their intense devotion be given to this which has a result in this world and the next. And also there are some subjects here that have been spoken of again and again because of their sweetness, and so that the people may act in accordance with them. If some things written are incomplete, this is because of the locality, or in consideration of the object, or due to the fault of the scribe. And I consider instructing you to be the best way of accomplishing this.

I have placed you over many thousands of people that you may win the people's affection.

All men are my children. What I desire for my own children, and I desire their welfare and happiness both in this world and the next, that I desire for all men. You do not understand to what extent I desire this, and if some of you do understand, you do not understand the full extent of my desire.

You must attend to this matter. While being completely law-abiding, some people are imprisoned, treated harshly and even killed without cause so that many people suffer. Therefore your aim should be to act with impartiality.

It is because of these things -- envy, anger, cruelty, hate, indifference, laziness or tiredness -- that such a thing does not happen. Therefore your aim should be: "May these things not be in me.

Those who are bored with the administration of justice will not be promoted; those who are not will move upwards and be promoted. Whoever among you understands this should say to his colleagues: "See that you do your duty properly. Such and such are Beloved-of-the-Gods' instructions. Failure in duty on your part will not please me. But done properly, it will win you heaven and you will be discharging your debts to me.

This edict is to be listened to on Tisa day, between Tisa days, and on other suitable occasions, it should be listened to even by a single person. Acting thus, you will be doing your duty. This edict has been written for the following purpose: that the judicial officers of the city may strive to do their duty and that the people under them might not suffer unjust imprisonment or harsh treatment.

To achieve this, I will send out Mahamatras every five years who are not harsh or cruel, but who are merciful and who can ascertain if the judicial officers have understood my purpose and are acting according to my instructions. Similarly, from Ujjayini, the prince will send similar persons with the same purpose without allowing three years to elapse. Likewise from Takhasila also.

When these Mahamatras go on tours of inspection each year, then without neglecting their normal duties, they will ascertain if judicial officers are acting according to the king's instructions. I wish to see that everything I consider to be proper is carried out in the right way.

Furthermore, they should understand that the king will forgive those who can be forgiven, and that he wishes to encourage them to practice Dhamma so that they may attain happiness in this world and the next. I am telling you this so that I may discharge the debts I owe, and that in instructing you, that you may know that my vow and my promise will not be broken.

Therefore acting in this way, you should perform your duties and assure them the people beyond the borders that: "The king is like a father. He feels towards us as he feels towards himself. We are to him like his own children.

You are able indeed to inspire them with confidence and to secure their welfare and happiness in this world and the next, and by acting thus, you will attain heaven as well as discharge the debts you owe to me.

And so that the Mahamatras can devote themselves at all times to inspiring the border areas with confidence and encouraging them to practice Dhamma, this edict has been written here. This edict is to be listened to every four months on Tisa day, between Tisa days, and on other suitable occasions, it should be listened to even by a single person.

Now the people in India who have not associated with the gods do so. This is the result of zeal and it is not just the great who can do this. Even the humble, if they are zealous, can attain heaven. And this proclamation has been made with this aim. Let both humble and great be zealous, let even those on the borders know and let zeal last long.

Then this zeal will increase, it will greatly increase, it will increase up to one-and-a-half times. This message has been proclaimed two hundred and fifty-six times by the king while on tour. In these ways, the Dhamma should be promoted.

Likewise, a teacher should be honored by his pupil and proper manners should be shown towards relations. This is an ancient rule that conduces to long life. Thus should one act. Written by the scribe Chapala. Whatever, reverend sirs, has been spoken by Lord Buddha, all that is well-spoken. These Dhamma texts -- Extracts from the Discipline, the Noble Way of Life, the Fears to Come, the Poem on the Silent Sage, the Discourse on the Pure Life, Upatisa's Questions, and the Advice to Rahula which was spoken by the Buddha concerning false speech -- these Dhamma texts, reverend sirs, I desire that all the monks and nuns may constantly listen to and remember.

I have had this written that you may know my intentions. Happiness in this world and the next is difficult to obtain without much love for the Dhamma, much self-examination, much respect, much fear of evil , and much enthusiasm. But through my instruction this regard for Dhamma and love of Dhamma has grown day by day, and will continue to grow. And my officers of high, low and middle rank are practicing and conforming to Dhamma, and are capable of inspiring others to do the same.

Mahamatras in border areas are doing the same. And these are my instructions: to protect with Dhamma, to make happiness through Dhamma and to guard with Dhamma. I have given the gift of sight in various ways.

And many other good deeds have been done by me. This Dhamma edict has been written that people might follow it and it might endure for a long time. And the one who follows it properly will do something good.

Episode 427 | 16 Sep 16 | 20m

Let me not ruin myself with these things. My Rajjukas are working among the people, among many hundreds of thousands of people. The hearing of petitions and the administration of justice has been left to them so that they can do their duties confidently and fearlessly and so that they can work for the welfare, happiness and benefit of the people in the country.

But they should remember what causes happiness and sorrow, and being themselves devoted to Dhamma, they should encourage the people in the country to do the same , that they may attain happiness in this world and the next.

These Rajjukas are eager to serve me. They also obey other officers who know my desires, who instruct the Rajjukas so that they can please me. Just as a person feels confident having entrusted his child to an expert nurse thinking: "The nurse will keep my child well," even so, the Rajjukas have been appointed by me for the welfare and happiness of the people in the country. The hearing of petitions and the administration of justice have been left to the Rajjukas so that they can do their duties unperturbed, fearlessly and confidently.

It is my desire that there should be uniformity in law and uniformity in sentencing. I even go this far, to grant a three-day stay for those in prison who have been tried and sentenced to death. During this time their relatives can make appeals to have the prisoners' lives spared. If there is none to appeal on their behalf, the prisoners can give gifts in order to make merit for the next world, or observe fasts. Indeed, it is my wish that in this way, even if a prisoner's time is limited, he can prepare for the next world, and that people's Dhamma practice, self-control and generosity may grow.

Cocks are not to be caponized, husks hiding living beings are not to be burnt and forests are not to be burnt either without reason or to kill creatures. One animal is not to be fed to another. On the three Caturmasis, the three days of Tisa and during the fourteenth and fifteenth of the Uposatha, fish are protected and not to be sold. During these days animals are not to be killed in the elephant reserves or the fish reserves either.

On the eighth of every fortnight, on the fourteenth and fifteenth, on Tisa, Punarvasu, the three Caturmasis and other auspicious days, bulls are not to be castrated, billy goats, rams, boars and other animals that are usually castrated are not to be.

On Tisa, Punarvasu, Caturmasis and the fortnight of Caturmasis, horses and bullocks are not be branded. In the twenty-six years since my coronation prisoners have been given amnesty on twenty-five occasions. Thinking: "How can the welfare and happiness of the people be secured?

I do the same for all groups. I have honored all religions with various honors. But I consider it best to meet with people personally. This Dhamma edict was written twenty-six years after my coronation.

Biography Of Samrat Ashok | Free PDF Download

But despite this, people did not grow through the promotion of the Dhamma. Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, said concerning this: "It occurs to me that in the past kings desired that the people might grow through the promotion of the Dhamma.

Now how can the people be encouraged to follow it? How can the people be encouraged to grow through the promotion of the Dhamma? How can I elevate them by promoting the Dhamma? When people hear these, they will follow them, elevate themselves and grow considerably through the promotion of the Dhamma. The Rajjukas who work among hundreds of thousands of people have likewise been ordered: "In this way and that encourage those who are devoted to Dhamma. But these are but minor achievements.

Such things to make the people happy have been done by former kings. I have done these things for this purpose, that the people might practice the Dhamma. Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, speaks thus: My Dhamma Mahamatras too are occupied with various good works among the ascetics and householders of all religions.

I have ordered that they should be occupied with the affairs of the Sangha. I have also ordered that they should be occupied with the affairs of the Brahmans and the Ajivikas. I have ordered that they be occupied with the Niganthas. And my Dhamma Mahamatras likewise are occupied with these and other religions. Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, speaks thus: These and other principal officers are occupied with the distribution of gifts, mine as well as those of the queens.

In my women's quarters, they organize various charitable activities here and in the provinces. I have also ordered my sons and the sons of other queens to distribute gifts so that noble deeds of Dhamma and the practice of Dhamma may be promoted.

And noble deeds of Dhamma and the practice of Dhamma consist of having kindness, generosity, truthfulness, purity, gentleness and goodness increase among the people. Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, speaks thus: Whatever good deeds have been done by me, those the people accept and those they follow.

Therefore they have progressed and will continue to progress by being respectful to mother and father, respectful to elders, by courtesy to the aged and proper behavior towards Brahmans and ascetics, towards the poor and distressed, and even towards servants and employees. Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, speaks thus: This progress among the people through Dhamma has been done by two means, by Dhamma regulations and by persuasion.

Of these, Dhamma regulation is of little effect, while persuasion has much more effect. The Dhamma regulations I have given are that various animals must be protected.

The Pillars of Ashoka

And I have given many other Dhamma regulations also. But it is by persuasion that progress among the people through Dhamma has had a greater effect in respect of harmlessness to living beings and non-killing of living beings. Concerning this, Beloved-of-the-Gods says: Wherever there are stone pillars or stone slabs, there this Dhamma edict is to be engraved so that it may long endure. It has been engraved so that it may endure as long as my sons and great-grandsons live and as long as the sun and the moon shine, and so that people may practice it as instructed.

For by practicing it happiness will be attained in this world and the next. This Dhamma edict has been written by me twenty-seven years after my coronation.

Whoever, whether monk or nun, splits the Sangha is to be made to wear white clothes and to reside somewhere other than in a monastery. Girnar version issued in B.

These fourteen edicts, with minor differences, are found in five different places throughout India. In two other places, they are found minus numbers 11, 12 and Girnar version, issued in B. The Cholas and Pandyas were south Indian peoples living outside Asoka's empire. The Satiyaputras and Keralaputras lived on the southwest seaboard of India.

Tamraparni is one of the ancient names for Sri Lanka. On Antiochos see Note The exact duties of these royal officers are not known. This probably refers to the drum that was beaten to announce the punishment of lawbreakers. See Samyutta Nikaya, IV Like many people in the ancient world, Asoka believed that when a just king ruled, there would be many auspicious portents. Kalsi version, issued in B. This seems to be a paraphrase of Dhammapada The Greeks Yona settled in large numbers in what is now Afghanistan and Pakistan after the conquests of Alexander the Great, although small communities lived there prior to this.

Bodh Gaya, the site of the Buddha's enlightenment, was known in ancient times as either Sambodhi or Vajirasana. Asoka obviously had the Mangala Sutta Sutta Nipata in mind when he issued this edict. Other versions substitute the following up to the end of the edict. It has also been said: "Generosity is good.

There a friend, a well-wisher, a relative or a companion should encourage others thus on appropriate occasions: "This should be done, this is good, by doing this, one can attain heaven. Similar to Dhammapada This sentence is usually translated "Therefore concord is commendable.

Kalinga corresponds roughly to the modern state of Orissa. Perhaps Asoka had in mind Dhammapada Dhauli version, issued in B. These two edicts are found in two different places.

This is reminiscent of the Buddha's words: "Just as a mother would protect her only child even at the risk of her own life, even so, let one cultivate a boundless heart towards all beings.

Gavimath version, issued in B. This edict is found in twelve different places. Some scholars think this means that Asoka became a monk. However it probably means that he started visiting Buddhist monks more often and listening to their instructions more carefully.

Brahmagiri version. This edict was found inscribed on a small rock near the town of Bairat and is now housed at the Asiatic Society in Calcutta. Its date is not known. This sentence is the converse of a similar one in the Tipitaka: " There is disagreement amongst scholars concerning which Pali suttas correspond to some of the text. Vinaya samukose: probably the Atthavasa Vagga, Anguttara Nikaya, Muni gatha: Muni Sutta, Sutta Nipata Upatisa pasine: Sariputta Sutta, Sutta Nipata The following seven edicts are from the Delhi Topra version, the first six being issued in B.

The first six edicts also appear on five other pillars. The meaning is unclear. It may mean that Asoka has given "the eye of wisdom," but taking into account the context, it more likely means he has stopped blinding as a form of punishment.

Similar to the ideas expressed by the Buddha in Dhammapada 50 and The identification of many of these animals is conjectural. The Ajivikas were a sect of ascetics in ancient India established by Makkhali Gosala, a contemporary of the Buddha. The Niganthas are the Jains. This inscription is found on a pillar in Lumbini where the Buddha was born. It was issued in B.

Allahabad version, date of issue not known. The words in brackets are missing due to damage on the pillar, but they can be reconstructed from the three other versions of this edict.

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The white clothes of the lay followers rather than the yellow robe of a monk or nun. However, in , George Turnour discovered an important Sri Lankan manuscript Dipavamsa , or "Island Chronicle" associating Piyadasi with Ashoka: Two hundred and eighteen years after the beatitude of the Buddha , was the inauguration of Piyadassi, Since then, the association of "Devanampriya Priyadarsin" with Ashoka was confirmed through various inscriptions, and especially confirmed in the Minor Rock Edict inscription discovered in Maski , directly associating Ashoka with his regnal title Devanampriya "Beloved-of-the-Gods" : [52] [53] [A proclamation] of Devanampriya Asoka.

Two and a half years [and somewhat more] have passed since I am a Buddha - Sakya. Those gods who formerly had been unmingled with men in Jambudvipa , have how become mingled with them. This object can be reached even by a lowly person who is devoted to morality. One must not think thus, — viz. His main interests were Sanchi and Sarnath , in addition to Harappa and Mohenjodaro. Sir Alexander Cunningham , a British archaeologist and army engineer, and often known as the father of the Archaeological Survey of India , unveiled heritage sites like the Bharhut Stupa, Sarnath, Sanchi, and the Mahabodhi Temple.

Mortimer Wheeler , a British archaeologist, also exposed Ashokan historical sources, especially the Taxila. Information about the life and reign of Ashoka primarily comes from a relatively small number of Buddhist sources.

Additional information is contributed by the Edicts of Ashoka , whose authorship was finally attributed to the Ashoka of Buddhist legend after the discovery of dynastic lists that gave the name used in the edicts Priyadarshi—'He who regards everyone with affection' as a title or additional name of Ashoka Maurya.

Architectural remains of his period have been found at Kumhrar , Patna , which include an pillar hypostyle hall. These inscriptions are dispersed throughout modern-day Pakistan and India, and represent the first tangible evidence of Buddhism. The edicts describe in detail the first wide expansion of Buddhism through the sponsorship of one of the most powerful kings of Indian history, offering more information about Ashoka's proselytism, moral precepts, religious precepts, and his notions of social and animal welfare.

It is essentially a Hinayana text, and its world is that of Mathura and North-west India. The emphasis of this little known text is on exploring the relationship between the king and the community of monks the Sangha and setting up an ideal of religious life for the laity the common man by telling appealing stories about religious exploits.

The most startling feature is that Ashoka's conversion has nothing to do with the Kalinga war, which is not even mentioned, nor is there a word about his belonging to the Maurya dynasty.

Equally surprising is the record of his use of state power to spread Buddhism in an uncompromising fashion. The legend of Veetashoka provides insights into Ashoka's character that are not available in the widely known Pali records. Obv: Symbols including a sun and an animal Rev: Symbol Dimensions: As it often refers to the royal dynasties of India, the Mahavamsa is also valuable for historians who wish to date and relate contemporary royal dynasties in the Indian subcontinent.

It is very important in dating the consecration of Ashoka. The chronicle is believed to be compiled from Atthakatha and other sources around the 3rd or 4th century CE. King Dhatusena 4th century had ordered that the Dipavamsa be recited at the Mahinda festival held annually in Anuradhapura. Numismatic research suggests that this symbol was the symbol of king Ashoka, his personal " Mudra ".

Building on traditional accounts, early scholars regarded Ashoka as a primarily Buddhist monarch who underwent a conversion to Buddhism and was actively engaged in sponsoring and supporting the Buddhist monastic institution.

Some scholars have tended to question this assessment. Romila Thappar writes about Ashoka that "We need to see him both as a statesman in the context of inheriting and sustaining an empire in a particular historical period, and as a person with a strong commitment to changing society through what might be called the propagation of social ethics. In his edicts, Ashoka expresses support for all the major religions of his time: Buddhism , Brahmanism , Jainism , and Ajivikaism , and his edicts addressed to the population at large there are some addressed specifically to Buddhists; this is not the case for the other religions generally focus on moral themes members of all the religions would accept.

For example, Amartya Sen writes, "The Indian Emperor Ashoka in the third century BCE presented many political inscriptions in favor of tolerance and individual freedom, both as a part of state policy and in the relation of different people to each other". In one edict he belittles rituals, and he banned Vedic animal sacrifices; these strongly suggest that he at least did not look to the Vedic tradition for guidance.

Furthermore, many edicts are expressed to Buddhists alone; in one, Ashoka declares himself to be an " upasaka ", and in another he demonstrates a close familiarity with Buddhist texts. He erected rock pillars at Buddhist holy sites, but did not do so for the sites of other religions.

He also used the word "dhamma" to refer to qualities of the heart that underlie moral action; this was an exclusively Buddhist use of the word. However, he used the word more in the spirit than as a strict code of conduct. Romila Thappar writes, "His dhamma did not derive from divine inspiration, even if its observance promised heaven. It was more in keeping with the ethic conditioned by the logic of given situations.

His logic of Dhamma was intended to influence the conduct of categories of people, in relation to each other. Especially where they involved unequal relationships. Instead, Ashoka's reason for adopting non-violence appears much more personal.

Chakravartin Ashoka Samrat

The Ashokavadana shows that the main source of Ashoka's conversion and the acts of welfare that followed are rooted instead in intense personal anguish at its core, from a wellspring inside himself rather than spurred by a specific event. It thereby illuminates Ashoka as more humanly ambitious and passionate, with both greatness and flaws. This Ashoka is very different from the "shadowy do-gooder" of later Pali chronicles.

All his inscriptions present him as compassionate and loving. In the Kalinga rock edits, he addresses his people as his "children" and mentions that as a father he desires their good.Retrieved 8 Dec Now it is conquest by Dhamma that Beloved-of-the-Gods considers to be the best conquest.

Rajdharma means the duty of the rulers, which was intrinsically entwined with the concept of bravery and dharma. Building on traditional accounts, early scholars regarded Ashoka as a primarily Buddhist monarch who underwent a conversion to Buddhism and was actively engaged in sponsoring and supporting the Buddhist monastic institution.

The young child put a handful of earth in the Buddha's begging bowl as his gift to the saint and declared his wish to one day become a great emperor and follower of the Buddha.

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